1. thedrugsyouwontletmetake replied to your post: Orit Arfa, an Israeli settler who spen…

    this is so twisted like something out of a monstrous nightmare

    her @thegazagirls account on twitter is actually way more offensive than the video (from the perspective of palestinian humanity)

  2. Orit Arfa, an Israeli settler who spends most of her worthless time making music video covers of popular songs (being under existential threat all the time frees up your schedule, I guess), has come out with a new “spoof” called “Kill All the Jews.” In it, she dresses up as a religiously observant Palestinian Muslim (three times) and exhorts her “fellow” Palestinians to, well, kill all the Jews.

    There’s a very bizarre undercurrent of glee that runs throughout this video. It contains some images of graphic violence committed against Israeli settlers, and I have to wonder if she feels such moral outrage over them, wouldn’t she have treated their bodies with more respect than this? It’s almost as if she’s celebrating the existence of antisemitism because it justifies her own racism and hatred. 

  3. avecsabombe:

Faiz Ahmad Faiz with friend Yasser Arafat. Faiz dedicated his book of poems Mere Dil, Mere Musaafer (My Heart, My Traveler) to Arafat and “the beleaguered, Wandering Palestinian[s]”, written in exile in Beirut after escaping the Zia regime in 1979.

    avecsabombe:

    Faiz Ahmad Faiz with friend Yasser Arafat. Faiz dedicated his book of poems Mere Dil, Mere Musaafer (My Heart, My Traveler) to Arafat and “the beleaguered, Wandering Palestinian[s]”, written in exile in Beirut after escaping the Zia regime in 1979.

    Reblogged from: avecsabombe
  4. One of the themes of Tolkien’s works is that “North” and “West” equal enlightenment, civilization, and salvation while “South” and “East” represents darkness and evil. I don’t think this is an accident or coincidence, it’s quite clearly the result of Tolkien’s biases and perhaps bigotry. So I take great pleasure in analyzing his heroes as metaphors for real-life “Eastern” people, who his works demeaned.

  5. Your pussy’s way too dry to be riding my dick like this. 

    The Dwarves represent Palestinians. Accept it and move on with your life, my goyische zionist friend.

  6. egotisticalgold:

    saint-jerome:

    Project Runway: “The Rainway,” Season 13 Episode 8

    Designer: Sean Kelly

    Model: Angelica Guillen-Jimenez

    It was AMAZING!

    Reblogged from: theelusivebloggeur
  7. 
Edward Said called him “the shrewdest and most original anti-imperialist analyst of Asia and Africa.” Born in Bihar in the early 1930s, Eqbal Ahmad lived a life that criss-crossed the globe; he was a journalist, an activist, and in the words of Noam Chomsky, a “counsellor and teacher.” He arrived in the U.S. in the ’50s as a fellow at Occidental College, later earning a Ph.D. at Princeton. Throughout his life, Ahmad was at the center of key moments in anti-imperialist history. As a young man, he traveled to Algeria, joining the FLN (National Liberation Front) with Frantz Fanon. He was also arrested in France and established a cultural centre in Tunis.
In the ’60s, Ahmad became a powerful voice in opposition to the Vietnam War and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Ahmad, alongside several anti-war Catholic activists, was arrested on charges of conspiracy to kidnap U.S. National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger, a case that ended in a mistrial in 1971. Ahmad would go on to hold several teaching positions in the U.S. at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Cornell, and Hampshire College. When asked by the journalist David Barsamian on what he tells his students, Ahmad responded: “I don’t tell them anything. I think that my life and my teachings all point to two morals: think critically and take risks.”
[x]

    Edward Said called him “the shrewdest and most original anti-imperialist analyst of Asia and Africa.” Born in Bihar in the early 1930s, Eqbal Ahmad lived a life that criss-crossed the globe; he was a journalist, an activist, and in the words of Noam Chomsky, a “counsellor and teacher.” He arrived in the U.S. in the ’50s as a fellow at Occidental College, later earning a Ph.D. at Princeton. Throughout his life, Ahmad was at the center of key moments in anti-imperialist history. As a young man, he traveled to Algeria, joining the FLN (National Liberation Front) with Frantz Fanon. He was also arrested in France and established a cultural centre in Tunis.

    In the ’60s, Ahmad became a powerful voice in opposition to the Vietnam War and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Ahmad, alongside several anti-war Catholic activists, was arrested on charges of conspiracy to kidnap U.S. National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger, a case that ended in a mistrial in 1971. Ahmad would go on to hold several teaching positions in the U.S. at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Cornell, and Hampshire College. When asked by the journalist David Barsamian on what he tells his students, Ahmad responded: “I don’t tell them anything. I think that my life and my teachings all point to two morals: think critically and take risks.”

    [x]

    Reblogged from: globalwarmist
  8. sikoot replied to your post: globalwarmist replied to your post:glo…

    lmao wajeeh look at you suddenly changing ur words when u got exposed

  9. ……………Did you actually read my reply? She made it up because I was on your side…bye Sami

  10. proof? hmm?

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